Articles Posted in Elder Population Studies

 New York Nursing Homes Cannot Tell Patients They Only Provide “Short-Term” Service

According to the New York Department of Health, a growing number of New York nursing homes are illegally telling potential patients that their facility only provides short-term care. Under New York law, this is illegal – there is no such thing as a “short-term” nursing home. In order to be licensed by the state, the facility must provide both short-term and long-term skilled nursing care. Further, it is illegal to discriminate against residents that may have long-term needs.

New York Nursing Homes Cannot Discriminate on the Basis of Payment

As the number of senior-citizens in New York City is expected to rapidly increase in the near-future, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer is calling for a city-wide, long-term plan to meet the needs of New York’s senior population. Between 2005 and 2015, the number of senior citizens (those over the age of 65) rose 19.2% percent. By 2040, New York City estimates that there will be 1.4 million senior citizens living in the five boroughs. According to the Comptroller, this rising demographic will have special needs that require an agency-by-agency approach to ensure an affordable and high-quality standard of living.

New York City’s senior citizens have unique needs. From a financial standpoint, almost 40 percent depend on governmental assistance for more than half of their income. The group also tends to spend more of their income on rent than other age groups – six out of ten senior citizens spend more than 30 percent of their monthly income just paying rent. To mitigate this problem, the Comptroller proposes freezing rents for senior citizens, expanding tax credits to senior citizens that own their homes and provide services to help finance home improvements that make homes more “senior-citizen friendly.”

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On October 18, 2016, six individuals were arrested in New York for  exploiting the financial vulnerability of nursing home residents; defendants are from Bronx, New York, Queens and Suffolk Counties. The five New York City defendants stole personal identity information from residents in order to secure cash or credit they were not entitled to; and the defendant from Suffolk County stole a necklace from a 95 year old female resident. Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman stated it is “reprehensible for caregivers to steal from defenseless residents in order to line their own pockets.” He continued to say his office will not tolerate financial exploitation and will vigilantly work to ensure nursing home resident’s personal and financial information is protected.  The six cases are summarized below:

  1. Diana English, Director of Social Services at Far Rockaway Nursing Home in Queens – Allegedly removed an elderly resident from the home and took him to his bank to withdraw money without the required medical clearance on June 24, 2015. The resident withdrew $500 from his account and gave it to the director; this occurred several times. The resident passed away the following month; English accessed his account with his PIN number and stole $1,200 from his account. The resident suffered from an anxiety disorder, physical issues due to hip replacement surgery, short and long term memory deficits , cognitive deficits and was unable to care for himself. She was arraigned in New York City Criminal Court – Queens County and is being charged with Endangering the Welfare of an Incompetent or Physically Disabled Person in the First Degree, Grand Larceny in the Fourth Degree, and Falsifying Business Records in the First Degree.
  2. Sandra Rivera-Tapia, Director of Social Work at Holliswood Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare in Queens – Allegedly obtained a resident’s ATM card and PIN number and stole $7,418 from the account. The money was acquired by making several cash withdrawals from various ATM’s in her neighborhood and throughout New York City, as well as store purchases on the card. The resident suffered from schizoaffective disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, sublaxation of the right hip, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and hypertension and was unable to care for himself. She was arraigned in New York City Criminal Court – Queens county and charged with two counts of Grand Larceny in the Third Degree, Endangering the Welfare of an Incompetent or Physically Disabled Person in the First Degree, and Unlawful Possession of Personal Identification Information in the Third Degree.

An experimental drug may have led researchers one step closer to preventing Alzheimer’s disease. The drug is called ‘aducanumab’ and was developed by Biogen, a pharmaceutical company based in Massachusetts who also funded the study; results were published on Wednesday on Nature.com.

alzheimer's study

In patients with Alzheimer’s, scientists have found an abnormal structure called ‘plaques’ in their brains, which they believe damage and kill nerve cells. Although these structures are found in most aging brains, they are not as abundant as those with early onset Alzheimer’s. The new drug targets, destroys and removes plaques, which are toxic proteins that lump together and build up in the brain. Researchers are optimistic yet cautious due to the small size of the trial,. However, neurologist and co-author of the study Stephen Salloway, said this is the best news on Alzheimer’s in 25 years.

 

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