Articles Posted in Infection

White Oaks Rehabilitation and Nursing Center received 22 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 21, 2020. The Woodbury nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement measures to adequately treat and care for residents’ bedsores / pressure ulcers. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide residents with necessary treatment and services to promote the healing of pressure ulcers, prevent infection of pressure ulcers, and prevent the development of new ulcers. A February 2017 citation found that White Oaks Rehabilitation and Nursing Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the physician’s wound care treatment orders for a resident’s Stage IV sacral pressure ulcer “were not revised to address the depth of the wound.” In an interview, the wound care physician stated that the wound’s measurements change with the position of the resident, that the wound was stable, and that he did not expect it to close, so the goal of its treatment was to prevent infection. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the evaluation of the resident and clarification of the treatment.

Continue reading

The Grand Pavilion for Rehab & Nursing at South Point received 32 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 20, 2020. The facility has also received two fines: one 2016 fine of $8,000 in connection to findings in a 2013 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding resident rights and administration; and one 2011 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2010 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure sores. The Island Park nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of seven surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from nursing home abuse. Under Section 483.12 of the Federal Code, nursing homes have a right to “be free from abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property, and exploitation.” A March 2019 citation found that The Grand Pavilion for Rehab & Nursing at South Point did not ensure one resident’s right to freedom from sexual abuse. The citation states specifically that a “cognitively intact resident… inappropriately touched another resident… who was assessed as having impaired cognition.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the placement of the first resident on one-to-one observation until he could be “discharged to another appropriate facility.”

Continue reading

Beach Terrace Care Center received 33 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 20, 2020. The Long Beach nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to care for residents’ bedsores/pressure ulcers. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home facilities must ensure residents receive the necessary care and services to promote the healing of pressure ulcers and bedsores. A May 2019 citation found that Beach Terrace Care Center did not comply with this section. An inspector found specifically that the nursing home “did not perform a timely assessment when a resident’s skin condition changed.” The resident in question had an open blister on their left heel, however, the facility had no documented evidence that this blister was assessed until two days after it was identified. According to this citation, although a Skin Assessment Sheet was filled out to inform the facility’s Wound Care Nurse, no note was written in the resident’s chart at the time it was identified. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the education of facility nursing staff on new procedures for documenting skin impairments.

Continue reading

Highfield Gardens Care Center of Great Neck received 32 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 5, 2020. The Great Neck nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide treatment and services consistent with professional practices to promote the healing of pressure ulcers, heal infection, and prevent new ulcers from developing. A January 2019 citation found that Highfield Gardens Care Center of Great Neck did not ensure such for one resident with a Stage IV sacral pressure ulcer. The citation specifically states that a Licensed Practical Nurse “did not provide treatment consistent with current standards of practice in the maintenance of infection control.” The citation goes on to state that the LPN dressed the resident’s wound and went to wash his hands, at which point the dressing fell off the wound and onto the resident’s briefs. The LPN then put the dressing back on the wound, according to the citation, and when asked by an inspector if the dressing “that he picked up was clean” was unable to answer. In an interview, a Registered Nurse stated that the “dressing that fell on the resident’s brief was not clean and the whole treatment had to be re-done.”

Continue reading

Nassau Rehabilitation & Nursing Center received 26 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 6, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2018 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2017 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2016 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings during a 2012 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure sores; and a 2014 fine of $6,000 in connection to findings in a 2011 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions. The Hempstead nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate accident-prevention measures. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure resident environments are “as free as accident hazards as is possible.” A June 2019 citation found that Nassau Rehabilitation & Nursing Center did not ensure such for two residents. The citation states specifically that clothing in two resident rooms “was observed hanging from the wall extension arm lamps, including hanging from the lamp light switches.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing Services said of one of the resident rooms that “the resident should not be hanging clothes on the lamp and we should ensure clothing is not hung from the lamp.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the removal and proper storage of the clothing in question, and the ordering of an additional storage rack for one of the residents.

Continue reading

Hempstead Park Nursing Home received 30 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 5, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2012 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2009 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; and a 2011 fine of $8,000 in connection to findings in a 2010 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding mistreatment and neglect, the investigation and reporting of alleged violations, social services, and administrative practices and procedures. The Hempstead nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately supervise residents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive “adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.” A May 2019 citation found that Hempstead Park Nursing Home did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident had been “identified as at risk for aspiration,” yet was observed eating in their bed without supervision. In an interview, a Certified Nursing Assistant told an inspector that “she was not aware the resident was supposed to eat in the dining room while supervised by staff.”

Continue reading

Villagecare Rehabilitation and Nursing Center received 12 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2019, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on January 31, 2020. The Manhattan nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate measures to prevent and care for pressure ulcers and bedsores. Section 483.25(c) of the Federal Code states that nursing homes must ensure residents receive a quality of care that prevents those admitted without pressure sores from developing such unless their condition renders it unavoidable; and that residents who have pressure sores receive necessary and proper care.

A November 2016 citation found that Villagecare Rehabilitation and Nursing Center neglected to ensure the provision of necessary treatment to a resident with a documented stage 2 pressure ulcer. The citation states specifically that in the resident’s Nursing Skin assessment for October 7, 2016 “The box to be checked indicating the presence of a pressure ulcer was not checked,” and the “skin examination section documented intact skin and the comment section was blank.” It goes on to state that there was an absence of documented evidence any “wound care orders were obtained when the pressure ulcer was identified” on October 6, 2016. In an interview, a Certified Care Associated stated that when she first cared for the resident, she informed a nurse that the resident had experienced skin breakdown; the Nurse Practitioner stated in an interview, however, that she documented the resident’s skin as dry and intact, and “may have missed identification of the sacral pressure ulcer.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of nursing and medical staff.

Continue reading

Fulton Commons Care Center received 27 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 27, 2020. The East Meadows nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of eight surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate measures to prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code provides that nursing homes must ensure resident environments remain free as possible of accident hazards. A July 2019 citation found that Fulton Commons Care Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident, who “had severely impaired cognition with moderate risk for elopement,” left the nursing home without staff noticing. The citation states further that the facility’s “perimeter exit door did not alarm as attended,” and that the resident was located a little over an hour later at a local bank.  A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the testing of all alarmed exit doors and the changing of the alarm on one door.

Continue reading

Harlem Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation received 32 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2019, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on January 31, 2020. The Manhattan nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide residents with an environment free of accident hazards. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires that resident environments remain “as free from accident hazards as is possible.” An August 2017 citation found that  Harlem Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation did not comply with this section. An inspector specifically observed “multiple resident rooms” that contain counters and/or wall surfaces with “sharp, jagged edges.” The citation states that an inspector also observed a television cord that was “plugged into an extension cord and taped to the wall,.” The citation states further that there was no documentation of any requests for repairs to the concerns described by the inspector, and that in an interview, a Licensed Practical Nurse said: “I hadn’t noticed the broken pieces of the sink or other resident rooms or equipment in need of repair. I will put a request for repairs in the maintenance book.” The citation describes these deficiencies as having the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

Continue reading

Northern Manor Geriatric Center received 34 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 13, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2016 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2014 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure sores; and another 2016 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2015 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure sores. The Nanuet nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent residents from sustaining falls. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must provide residents an environment “as free of accident hazards as is possible” and with “adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.” A January 2019 citation found that Northern Manor Geriatric Center did not ensure effective assistance devices were provided to residents who required them. The citation states specifically that in connection to a resident’s fall while being transferred from their bed to their wheelchair via a mechanical lift using a sling, the nursing home did not ensure “the sling was laundered according to the manufacture’s [sic] instructions,” that the facility’s staff had been trained to assess the sling’s functionality before using it, and that the nursing home had a system to inspect such slings. The citation notes that the residents sustained a redacted injury from the fall, and was sent to the hospital.

Continue reading

Contact Information