Articles Posted in Infection

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A nursing home in Rochester, New York has received citations for accident hazards and medication errors.

Kirkhaven has received 25 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on May 7, 2021. The Rochester nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following: Continue reading

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A nursing home in Delmar, New York has been cited for infection control failures.

Delmar Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing has received 81 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on May 7, 2021. The facility has additionally received two fines totaling $20,000 since 2013. The Delmar nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following: Continue reading

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A nursing home in Oswego, New York has received $46,000 in fines since 2013.

Pontiac Nursing Home has received 37 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 30, 2021. The facility has additionally received three fines totaling $46,000 since 2013. The Oswego nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following: Continue reading

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A nursing home in the Bronx, New York was cited for infection control and other failures.

New Riverdale Rehab and Nursing has received 12 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to health records accessed on April 21, 2021. The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent infection. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide residents with a safe, sanitary environment through the creation and maintenance of an infection prevention and control program. An October 2019 citation found that New Riverdale Rehab and Nursing failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that a nursing home who received oxygen through a nasal cannula was observed with their oxygen tubing resting on the floor of their room, in contravention of facility policy. In an interview, a Registered Nurse Supervisor said in part, “The tubing is not supposed to be on the floor. The oxygen tubing should not touch the floor in any way. It should be hanging on the mattress next to the residents head. This is an infection control issue. You can transmit an infection to the resident from the floor.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the replacement of the tubing and the observation of the resident for signs of infection. Continue reading

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The nursing home in Syracuse, New York was cited for findings of improper PPE use during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Bishop Rehabilitation and Nursing Center has received 75 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to health records accessed on April 16, 2021. The Syracuse nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 15 inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent infection. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to create and maintain an infection control program designed to prevent infection. A September 2020 citation found that Bishop Rehabilitation and Nursing Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing home two registered nurses and a licensed practical nurse “were observed wearing face masks below their noses” while treating a resident, and that a unit aide was observed “wearing a face mask below her nose and mouth while sitting with 2 residents and speaking with another staff member,” in contravention of the facility’s guidelines concerning the use of personal protective equipment. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of relevant staff.

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The nursing home in Valley Cottage, New York has received 49 citations since 2017.

Tolstoy Foundation Rehabilitation and Nursing Center has received 49 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to health records accessed on April 16, 2021. The Valley Cottage nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of two inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from accident hazards. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must provide residents with an environment as free as possible of accident hazards and with adequate supervision to prevent accidents. A December 2019 citation found that Tolstoy Foundation Rehabilitation and Nursing Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that one resident who was observed smoking cigarettes outside the building’s rear entrance “did not have a safe smoking evaluation completed since admission” and that his “comprehensive care plan did not include safety measures for smoking including the use of cigarettes and lighters.” In an interview, the resident stated he had never been spoken to regarding the nursing home’s smoking policies. A Certified Nursing Assistant said in an interview that he was not aware where the resident kept his smoking materials, had never asked if the resident was allowed to smoke, and had never been directed regarding the resident’s smoking status. A Registered Nurse manager stated in a separate interview that she was not aware whether a smoking assessment had been or should be performed for the resident, nor “who was responsible for completing the smoking care plans.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a safe smoking evaluation of all smoking residents.

Creekview Nursing and Rehab Center received 119 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 1, 2021. The facility has also received seven fines since 2013, totaling $62,000, over findings of health code violations. The Rochester nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 13 inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

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In addition to infection control lapses, the New York nursing home was also cited for medication errors.

1. The nursing home did not provide an adequate level of care for pressure ulcers. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents with pressure ulcers receive necessary treatment and services to promote healing and prevent infection. An October 2020 citation found that Creekview Nursing and Rehab Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that one resident’s pressure ulcer and skin “were not properly cleaned,” that “the correct dressing was not applied,” and that “the resident was not repositioned as care planned.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the counseling of the Licensed Practical Nurse who completed the care, as well as Certified Nursing Assistants who cared for the resident.

The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Mohawk received 44 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 1, 2021. The facility has also received three fines since 2019, totaling $22,000, over findings of health code violations. The Ilion nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 10 inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

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The nursing home in New York was also cited for medication errors.

1. The nursing home did not employ adequate measures to control infection. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must help prevent the transmission of communicable diseases and infections by creating and upholding an infection control program. A December 2020 citation found that The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Mohawk failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that two Certified Nursing Aides “tested positive for COVID-19 and returned to work” before completing a 14-day quarantine and receiving negative PCR tests. Guidance at the time held that nursing home employees who test positive and remain asymptomatic were not eligible to return to work for 14 days from their positive result, while symptomatic employees were required to wait 14 days plus 3 days since the resolution of fever. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

Brooklyn-Queens Nursing Home received 15 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 1, 2021. The Brooklyn nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of two inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

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New York health inspectors found that the nursing home in Brooklyn did not provide residents with a safe, clean, comfortable, and homelike environment.

1. The nursing home did not employ adequate infection-control measures. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to create and uphold a program designed to prevent and control infection. A September 2019 citation found that Brooklyn-Queens Nursing Home failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that an inspector observed “clean linens… resting on top of the garbage can in a resident’s room,” posing an infection risk. In an interview, a Certified Nursing Assistant who was providing the resident with care while the clean linens were observed un-bagged atop a garbage can said that “he knows he should not have done that as he has received in-service on infection control procedure and protocol.” The facility’s Director of Nursing affirmed in an interview that the CNA “should never have placed the soiled linen on the garbage can” and that the CNA would be re-educated on infection control policies and procedures. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the immediate discarding of the linens in question.

Pelham Parkway Nursing Care and Rehabilitation Facility received 25 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 26, 2021. The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

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The New York Department of Health also cited the Bronx nursing home for failing to supervise a resident who left the facility undetected.

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from sexual abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code grants nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A December 2019 citation found that Pelham Parkway Nursing Care failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that when “multiple facility staff suspected” that a resident “was sexually abusing his roommate… and reported it to the supervisors,” the supervisors in question failed to investigate the allegation or report it to the nursing home’s Director of Nursing. As such, the resident and his roommate “were not separated and continued to be roommates.” Records showed that in an interview, the resident “stated that he had performed an inappropriate sex act” and that “it was only once that he forced himself and sexually assaulted” his roommate, after which the two residents remained “in the same room for months.” The citation states that the Unit Supervisor told the resident “it was inappropriate to touch another resident without consent” but did not separate the residents or inform the Director of Nursing, believing the facility’s night supervisor “would do something about the allegation,” although he “did not discuss the incident with the night supervisor.” A plan of correction taken by the facility included the separation of the residents and the in-servicing of staff.

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