Articles Posted in Neglect

Carillon Nursing and Rehabilitation Center received 21 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 28, 2020. The Huntington nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did implement adequate measures to prevent abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” An August 2019 citation found that Carillon Nursing and Rehabilitation Center did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation states specifically that a Certified Nursing Aide pushed a resident “in her bed using his hand over her head/face three times when the resident was trying to get out of bed.” The citation states that according to the patient, the CNA in question “was verbally abusive,” put his hand over her face, and pushed her head into her pillow “three times asking her to shut up.” The resident stated further that the CNA’s aggression and demeanor “shocked” her. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the CNA in question.

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Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center received 21 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 28, 2020. The Sayville nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer (bedsore) care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure that a resident with pressure ulcers receives “necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.” A March 2018 citation found that Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specificaly that the resident developed a deep tissue injury on their right heel while in the facility, but that “multiple observations were made of the heel not being offloaded (to prevent contact with any surface) per physician’s orders.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing Services stated that the facility should have provided the resident with “better coordinated” care and that the resident’s “care plan should have been updated” with more specific interventions.

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Brookside Multicare Nursing Center received 37 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 27, 2020. The facility has also received four fines: a 2019 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2018 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2016 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2014 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding resident rights, quality of care, and administrative practices and procedures; a 2015 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2014 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of life, accidents and supervision, and administrative practices and procedures; and a 2012 fine of $4,000 in connection to findings in a 2011 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care and administrative practices. The Smithtown nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing home environments to remain “as free of accident hazards as is possible.” A January 2018 citation found that Brookside Multicare Nursing Center did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that a resident who “had severely impaired cognition and required assistance with bed mobility and transfers” was discovered with his bed against his room’s heating unit and his legs “resting on the heating unit,” having sustained “extensive” burns. The resident was later transferred to a hospital. In interviews, facility staff said they did not know how the resident’s legs ended up on the radiator.

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Townhouse Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing received 29 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 20, 2020. The facility has also received four fines: a 2019 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2019 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2018 fine of $16,000 in connection to findings in a 2018 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2017 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings in a 2017 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding the use of physical restraints; and a 2017 fine of $4,000 in connection to findings in a 2016 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care and administrative practices. The Uniondale nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of ten surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure residents were protected from neglect. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code guarantees nursing home residents the right to “be free from… neglect.” An August 2018 citation found that Townhouse Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing did not ensure such for one resident. The citation describes specifically an instance in which the facility’s security guard on duty “left his post unattended,” after which a resident eloped. The resident was later found a block away from the nursing home and returned to it ‘without any injury.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the security guard in question.

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Williamsbridge Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing received 29 citations for violations of public health laws between 2015 and 2019, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on November 14, 2019. These citations include one that authorities determined to reflect “a severe, systemic deficiency.” The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state authorities. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide an environment free of accident hazards. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing home facilities are required to provide an environment as free as possible from accident hazards, and to provide proper supervision to prevent accidents. A citation issued on April 23, 2019 found that the nursing home failed to adequately supervise a resident with a history of attempted elopement, who eloped from the facility on April 5, 2019. According to the citation, the resident was not accounted for during an 11 AM head count, and the nursing home did not launch a search for the resident until 2:30 PM. As of the date of the citation, the resident’s whereabouts remained unknown. The Department of Health found that this failure resulted in “immediate jeopardy to resident health or safety” and reflected a systemic deficiency.

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Mayfair Care Center received 42 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 6, 2020. The Hempstead nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code provides nursing home residents with “the right to be free from abuse.” A July 2018 citation found that Mayfair Care Center did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident wandered into the room of another resident “with a history of physically abusive behavior,” who then pushed the first resident to the floor, resulting in a redacted medical condition and transfer to the hospital. The citation notes that this deficiency resulted in the occurrence of “actual harm.”

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Nassau Rehabilitation & Nursing Center received 26 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 6, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2018 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2017 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2016 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings during a 2012 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure sores; and a 2014 fine of $6,000 in connection to findings in a 2011 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions. The Hempstead nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate accident-prevention measures. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure resident environments are “as free as accident hazards as is possible.” A June 2019 citation found that Nassau Rehabilitation & Nursing Center did not ensure such for two residents. The citation states specifically that clothing in two resident rooms “was observed hanging from the wall extension arm lamps, including hanging from the lamp light switches.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing Services said of one of the resident rooms that “the resident should not be hanging clothes on the lamp and we should ensure clothing is not hung from the lamp.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the removal and proper storage of the clothing in question, and the ordering of an additional storage rack for one of the residents.

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Parkview Care and Rehabilitation Center received 32 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 6, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2017 fine of $4,000 in connection to findings that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of life and unnecessary drugs; and a 2016 fine of $12,000 in connection to findings in a 2014 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care and administration. The Massapequa nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of eight surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure proper treatment and care of pressure ulcers and bedsores. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must provide residents with pressure ulcers “necessary treatment and services to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new sores from developing.” A September 2016 citation found that Parkview Care and Rehabilitation Center did not provide such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident was assessed by a Licensed Practical Nurse for a pressure ulcer acquired while at the facility, and that “there was no documented evidence that the Nurse Practitioner (NP) or other qualified health professional completed an assessment of the pressure ulcer.” In an interview, the facility’s nurse practitioner stated that they were not aware why there was no evidence of the ulcer’s assessment by a “qualified health professional,” and that the facility’s wound care physician was not available to provide any comment. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the nurse practitioner’s assessment of the pressure ulcer. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

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Hempstead Park Nursing Home received 30 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 5, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2012 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings during a 2009 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; and a 2011 fine of $8,000 in connection to findings in a 2010 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding mistreatment and neglect, the investigation and reporting of alleged violations, social services, and administrative practices and procedures. The Hempstead nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately supervise residents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive “adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.” A May 2019 citation found that Hempstead Park Nursing Home did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident had been “identified as at risk for aspiration,” yet was observed eating in their bed without supervision. In an interview, a Certified Nursing Assistant told an inspector that “she was not aware the resident was supposed to eat in the dining room while supervised by staff.”

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Fulton Commons Care Center received 27 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 27, 2020. The East Meadows nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of eight surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate measures to prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code provides that nursing homes must ensure resident environments remain free as possible of accident hazards. A July 2019 citation found that Fulton Commons Care Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident, who “had severely impaired cognition with moderate risk for elopement,” left the nursing home without staff noticing. The citation states further that the facility’s “perimeter exit door did not alarm as attended,” and that the resident was located a little over an hour later at a local bank.  A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the testing of all alarmed exit doors and the changing of the alarm on one door.

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