Articles Posted in Neglect

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Recent investigations into former governor Cuomo found that a sizable number of Covid-19 nursing home deaths had been under reported and excluded from the total number of deaths.

A New York assemblyman has said that the legislative body’s investigation of former governor Andrew Cuomo found that his administration provided misleading information about Covid-19 deaths in New York nursing homes, according to a recent AP News report. The assembly’s inquiry reportedly confirmed earlier investigations by news organizations that found “gaps in the state’s statistical accounting of fatalities,” like its omission of “thousands” of Covid-19 deaths after residents were transferred from their nursing home facilities to local hospitals.  Continue reading

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A recent report has found that nursing homes across the country are vastly understaffed and they are not receiving citations for going against regulations.

A new report by the Long-Term Community Care Coalition has found that while insufficient staffing is a widespread problem in nursing homes, state nursing home surveyors rarely issue citations for it. The report, titled “Broken Promises,” analyzes nursing home citations from 2018 until 2020.  Continue reading

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Nursing homes are required to respect their patients and properly care for them but recent reports have shown that most facilities are not following these guidelines and are consistently violating patients’ rights and putting them at risk.

The Long-Term Community Care Coalition recently published the results of its analysis of nationwide nursing home citation data from 2018 to 2020. The organization’s report, titled “Broken Promises,” found that whereas Long-Term Care Ombudsmen receive complaints about resident rights violations more than most other violations, only 2% of citations during the period in question were for resident rights violations. Continue reading

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Recent data shows that more than 250,000 nursing home residents across the country have been given unnecessary antipsychotic drugs by staff in order to sedate the patients.

A recent analysis of federal nursing home citation data by the Long-Term Community Care Coalition found that nearly 20% of nursing home residents in the United States have been administered one or more antipsychotic medications, the unnecessary use of which are prohibited by federal law. That figure constitutes more than 250,000 nursing home residents.  Continue reading

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A recent report found that over 90,000 nursing home patients across the country are suffering from pressure ulcers and local health departments are not issuing citations for staff failing to prevent and care for these open sores that could potentially be harmful to patients.

A new report by the Long Term Community Care Coalition reveals that nearly one in ten nursing home residents have unhealed pressure ulcers. According to data analyzed by the organization, 7.92% of nursing home residents in the United States, or approximately 92,000 people, are suffering from unhealed pressure ulcers. The LTCCC suggests that this figure is “likely a significant undercount, since studies have found that many nursing homes under-report these data.” Continue reading

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Van Duyn Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Syracuse has received a total of 89 citations for being in violation of public health and safety codes and has been previously placed on a list that could make this nursing home one of the worst facilities.

Van Duyn Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing has received 89 citations for violations of public health and safety code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on October 15, 2021. The Syracuse nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 20 surveys by state inspectors. The most recent inspection—on June 18th, 2021—described the following deficiencies:

1. The nursing home did not adequately prevent accidents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive an environment as free as possible of accident hazards. A June 2021 citation found that Van Duyn Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the facility lacked a plan to evacuate a resident who weighed around 700 pounds and “was not mobile” from their room during an emergency. As the citation describes, the resident “required assistance with activities of daily living” and their care plan documented the need of a mechanical lift. In an interview, staff members said the resident’s bed would not fit through their room’s doorway and that they were “not trained in bariatric evacuation.” Both a certified nursing aide and a licensed practical nurse stated that they had not been trained in bariatric evacuation and were not sure how to evacuate the resident. In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing said they were not certain whether there was an evacuation plan for bariatric residents. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the development of an evacuation plan for the resident, the training of staff, and the purchase of necessary equipment.

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The number of nursing home staff members has rapidly declined since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic and it is only getting worse, leading to neglected patients, budgeting cuts, and possible nursing home closures if this is not quickly rectified.

Plummeting staffing levels have devastated the nursing home industry, according to an Associated Press analysis which found that one-third of US facilities have “fewer nurses and aides than before the Covid-19 pandemic.” One expert described the stark decline in staffing levels as “appalling.” Continue reading

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During the Covid-19 pandemic nursing homes had as many as 40,000 deaths due to staff being overworked and neglecting many nursing home residents.

An Associated Press analysis of 15,000 nursing homes across the United States found that the Covid-19 pandemic may have resulted in as many as 40,000 excess deaths—that is, premature deaths from causes other than Covid-19. Experts suggested to the AP that nursing home residents may have died of neglect as overworked staffers tended to residents suffering from the disease. Continue reading

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Buffalo Community Healthcare Center has received four fines and over 80 citations in the last four years for failing to prevent accidents from occurring, for lacking proper care for pressure ulcers, and for failing to avert any medication errors.

Buffalo Community Healthcare Center has received 82 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on October 1, 2021. The facility has also received four fines totaling $26,000 since 2017. The Buffalo nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 10 inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to care for pressure ulcers. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide a consistent, professional level of care to prevent residents from developing avoidable pressure ulcers and to promote the healing of existing pressure ulcers. An April 2021 citation found that Buffalo Community Healthcare Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing facility did not provide consistent weekly pressure ulcer assessments by a qualified person for one resident, and did not accurately document Treatment Administration Records. In an interview, a Registered Nurse said that the because the resident’s pressure ulcers were not treated as ordered or documented properly, the resident’s wounds “had the potential to get worse and because of the drainage, the wounds could get infected.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the education of nursing staff.

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New York nursing home, The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell, has been in violation of public health codes 66 times in the last four years and has been cited for medication failures, failure to prevent accidents and falls, and for neglect which has lead to incontinence and pressure ulcers.

The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell received 66 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on September 17, 2021. It has also received eight fines totaling $78,000 since 2012. The Valatie nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 17 surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from neglect. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents the right to be free from neglect. A December 2018 citation found that The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell failed to ensure such. The citation specifically describes the nursing home’s failure to timely provide one resident with interventions for skin, incontinence, and pressure ulcer care; to timely provide another resident with planned interventions with skin and bladder incontinence care; and to timely provide a third resident with planned interventions for pressure ulcer development and incontinence. According to the citation, the facility left the first resident uncared for for a period of 6 hours and 10 minutes, the second resident uncared for for a period of 11 hours and 37 minutes, and the third resident uncared for for a period of 11 hours and 51 minutes. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the educational counseling of nurses and nursing aides.

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