Articles Posted in Neglect

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New York nursing home, The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell, has been in violation of public health codes 66 times in the last four years and has been cited for medication failures, failure to prevent accidents and falls, and for neglect which has lead to incontinence and pressure ulcers.

The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell received 66 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on September 17, 2021. It has also received eight fines totaling $78,000 since 2012. The Valatie nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 17 surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from neglect. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents the right to be free from neglect. A December 2018 citation found that The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell failed to ensure such. The citation specifically describes the nursing home’s failure to timely provide one resident with interventions for skin, incontinence, and pressure ulcer care; to timely provide another resident with planned interventions with skin and bladder incontinence care; and to timely provide a third resident with planned interventions for pressure ulcer development and incontinence. According to the citation, the facility left the first resident uncared for for a period of 6 hours and 10 minutes, the second resident uncared for for a period of 11 hours and 37 minutes, and the third resident uncared for for a period of 11 hours and 51 minutes. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the educational counseling of nurses and nursing aides.

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Recent reports show that nursing homes are prescribing antipsychotic drugs at an alarmingly high rate to patients that do not even require these medications.

Nursing homes are over-diagnosing patients with schizophrenia in order to conceal the high rates at which they’re prescribing antipsychotic medications, according to a recent report by the New York Times. Schizophrenia diagnoses among nursing home residents have “soared” as much as 70% since the federal government started making public disclosures of antipsychotic drug prescriptions in 2012. These prescriptions factor into nursing homes’ funding and ratings: nursing homes that prescribe them at high rates can receive lower ratings from the government, which in turn can affect their funding.

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A Brooklyn nursing home has received a total of 19 citations from state inspectors between 2017 and 2021.

NY Congregational Nursing Center received 19 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 27, 2021. The Brooklyn nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home failed to protect its residents from abuse. Under Section 483.12 of the Federal Code, nursing home residents have “the right to be free from abuse.” A March 2021 citation found that NY Congregational Nursing Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the failed to protect a resident from abuse by another resident with a history of aggression. After the incident in question, the victim was observed “lying in bed with blood all over their face, blood at the back of the head; with swollen eyes and swollen and bleeding lips.” The citation goes on to state that “a lot of blood was on the floor next to the nightstand.” An investigation found that staff did not foresee the incident and had not implemented interventions to prevent the aggressor from entering other residents’ rooms, even though the resident was known to do so. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the education of facility staff.

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Thousands of Covid-19 nursing home deaths are being examined in order to address underlying issues.

A report released last year by New York Assemblyman Ron Kim examined the thousands of deaths from Covid-19 in the state’s nursing homes in an attempt to identify underlying problems that caused the raft of fatalities and what can be done to address those problems. The report, published by Kim’s office in July 2020, is available here.

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A nursing home in Glen Cove, New York has received more than a dozen health and safety code citations in the last four years.

Emerge Nursing and Rehabilitation at Glen Cove received 14 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 14, 2021. The Glen Cove nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents an environment as free as possible of accident hazards and with adequate supervision to prevent accidents. A February 2021 citation found that Emerge Nursing and Rehabilitation at Glen Cove failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing home left “numerous chemical agents… unattended or unsecured” in two resident units. The cleaning chemicals in question included Fresh Scent Deodorizer Concentrate, Non-Acid Disinfectant Bathroom Cleaner, Glass Cleaner and Protector Concentrate, HB Quad Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate, Peroxide Cleaner Concentrate, Lysol Foaming, and Lemon Polish. In an interview, the facility’s Director of Housekeeping said the items “should not have been left unsecured” and “were potentially hazardous to residents if ingested.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of a housekeeper.

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A nursing home in Gowanda, New York has received citations for violations of health and safety code.

Gowanda Rehabilitation & Nursing Center received 28 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 14, 2021. The Long Beach nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer care. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes are required to provide residents with professional levels of care to promote the healing and prevent the infection of pressure ulcers. A May 2019 citation found that Gowanda Rehabilitation & Nursing Center failed to ensure such for two residents. The citation states specifically that there was no “weekly assessment by a qualified person after a pressure area was identified” for one resident, and that for the other there was “a five-day delay in assessment  by a qualified person” following the identification of a pressure area. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a full-house audit, the revision of the facility’s skin care protocol, and the educational counseling of nursing staff who did not properly document a resident’s pressure area.

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A nursing home in Troy, New York has received 45 health and safety code citations in the last four years.

Troy Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing received 45 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 14, 2021. The Troy nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from accidents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive a level of supervision and assistance devices adequate to prevent them from sustaining accidents. A March 2021 citation found that Troy Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing home did not adequately supervise a resident with a history of wandering, who was subsequently found in another resident’s room. In an interview, one of the facility’s nurses said that the resident “was allowed to wander out of his room, and that there were no care planned interventions for supervising or monitoring” him. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the development of a care plan for wandering.

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A new report finds that the majority of US nursing homes fell short of minimum staffing levels in the first three months of 2021.

The majority of nursing homes in the United States failed to meet minimum care staff thresholds in the first quarter of 2021, according to an analysis by the Long Term Community Care Coalition. A federal study published in 2001 established that minimum threshold as 4.10 total care staff hours per resident day (HRPD) and 0.75 registered nurse HRPD. The LTCCC found that 63% of nursing homes did not meet this threshold. Continue reading

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A new report concluded that a controversial March 2020 order by Governor Andrew Cuomo caused additional nursing home resident deaths from Covid-19.

A report published by the New York State Bar Association Task Force on Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care, obtained and described by the New York Post, found that a controversial order by Governor Andrew Cuomo resulted in additional nursing home deaths from Covid-19. The March 2020 order required nursing homes to admit patients with Covid-19, and Cuomo has asserted in the past that it did not cause any increase in nursing home resident deaths. Continue reading

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Staff at New York State Veterans Nursing Home in St. Albans, Queens are reportedly concerned about thousands of boxes of PPE left outside the facility.

New York State Veterans Home in St. Albans, Queens has reportedly left “1,000 boxes of PPE outside under a blue tarp for months,” leaving the supplies vulnerable to the elements, according to a recent report by THE CITY. The personal protective equipment includes medical gowns and other supplies, much of which has reportedly “been rendered unusable from rot and mildew.” Facility staff told the publication that there are “hundreds more boxes of PPE… stacked floor to ceiling” inside the facility, even though those rooms, including a library and a physical therapy unit, are “intended for resident use.”

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