Articles Posted in Neglect

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A nursing home in Gowanda, New York has received citations for violations of health and safety code.

Gowanda Rehabilitation & Nursing Center received 28 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 14, 2021. The Long Beach nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer care. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes are required to provide residents with professional levels of care to promote the healing and prevent the infection of pressure ulcers. A May 2019 citation found that Gowanda Rehabilitation & Nursing Center failed to ensure such for two residents. The citation states specifically that there was no “weekly assessment by a qualified person after a pressure area was identified” for one resident, and that for the other there was “a five-day delay in assessment  by a qualified person” following the identification of a pressure area. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a full-house audit, the revision of the facility’s skin care protocol, and the educational counseling of nursing staff who did not properly document a resident’s pressure area.

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A nursing home in Troy, New York has received 45 health and safety code citations in the last four years.

Troy Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing received 45 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 14, 2021. The Troy nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from accidents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive a level of supervision and assistance devices adequate to prevent them from sustaining accidents. A March 2021 citation found that Troy Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing home did not adequately supervise a resident with a history of wandering, who was subsequently found in another resident’s room. In an interview, one of the facility’s nurses said that the resident “was allowed to wander out of his room, and that there were no care planned interventions for supervising or monitoring” him. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the development of a care plan for wandering.

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A new report finds that the majority of US nursing homes fell short of minimum staffing levels in the first three months of 2021.

The majority of nursing homes in the United States failed to meet minimum care staff thresholds in the first quarter of 2021, according to an analysis by the Long Term Community Care Coalition. A federal study published in 2001 established that minimum threshold as 4.10 total care staff hours per resident day (HRPD) and 0.75 registered nurse HRPD. The LTCCC found that 63% of nursing homes did not meet this threshold. Continue reading

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A new report concluded that a controversial March 2020 order by Governor Andrew Cuomo caused additional nursing home resident deaths from Covid-19.

A report published by the New York State Bar Association Task Force on Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care, obtained and described by the New York Post, found that a controversial order by Governor Andrew Cuomo resulted in additional nursing home deaths from Covid-19. The March 2020 order required nursing homes to admit patients with Covid-19, and Cuomo has asserted in the past that it did not cause any increase in nursing home resident deaths. Continue reading

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Staff at New York State Veterans Nursing Home in St. Albans, Queens are reportedly concerned about thousands of boxes of PPE left outside the facility.

New York State Veterans Home in St. Albans, Queens has reportedly left “1,000 boxes of PPE outside under a blue tarp for months,” leaving the supplies vulnerable to the elements, according to a recent report by THE CITY. The personal protective equipment includes medical gowns and other supplies, much of which has reportedly “been rendered unusable from rot and mildew.” Facility staff told the publication that there are “hundreds more boxes of PPE… stacked floor to ceiling” inside the facility, even though those rooms, including a library and a physical therapy unit, are “intended for resident use.”

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The Queens nursing home has received 15 citations since 2017, including one for abuse and one for failing to provide a clean enough environment.

Midway Nursing Home received 15 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 2, 2021. The Maspeth nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse. Under Section 483.12 of the Federal Code guarantees nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A May 2021 citation found that Midway Nursing Home failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the facility did not ensure a resident was kept free from verbal abuse, nor that verbal abuse was immediately reported. The citation goes on to describe an incident in which “a nurse verbally and mentally abused” a resident. According to the citation, staff who witnessed the incident “did not immediately report the incident to the Director of Nursing or Nursing Supervisor,” and the resident later reported experiencing “heightened anger and stress” following the incident of verbal abuse. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the separation of the resident and the nurse, who was later terminated following an investigation. The staffer who witnessed the incident was provided a disciplinary action and re-education.

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A new law in New York will create staffing standards for nursing homes.

Legislation signed this month by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo will establish new staffing mandates for nursing homes and hospitals in the state. Under the new law, which will take effect in January 2022, nursing homes will be required to “meet a minimum daily average of 3 1/2 hours of nursing care per resident,” according to a report by Healthcare Dive. Continue reading

The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center at Kingsbridge has received eight citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on June 18, 2021. Those citations include a finding of systemic accident hazards in the facility, which also received a $10,000 fine in 2016. The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five inspections by state authorities. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent accidents such as elopement. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must keep their facilities “as free of accident hazards as is possible” and provide residents with adequate supervision to prevent accidents. A February 2021 citation found that The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center failed to ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that after new windows were installed in the resident’s rom, the nursing home “failed to ensure the window’s safety latch was in place to prevent the window from tilting into the room and fully opening.” The resident had been identified as at risk for elopement, and had been observed exhibiting increased “exit-seeking behaviors” that were not reported to the physician. At a redacted date, surveillance video showed, the resident opened the window in their room, “threw tied sheets out, and climbed out the window.” They then fell to the ground and were found by staff several hours later, after which they were “transferred to the hospital and expired.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of two Certified Nursing Assistants and a Licensed Practical Nurse.

2. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent physical abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A January 2021 citation found that The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center failed to ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that during an incident in which a resident slapped a Certified Nursing Assistant, the Certified Nursing Assistant “retaliated and slapped” the resident’s left cheek, causing the resident’s eyeglasses to fall to the floor. The citation states that the incident was witnessed by a housekeeper and another Certified Nursing Assistant. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the suspension and then the termination of the Certified Nursing Assistant.

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The nursing home in Campbell Hall, New York was cited for medication errors, among other things.

Campbell Hall Rehabilitation Center received 60 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on June 11, 2021. The facility has also been the subject of fines totaling $18,000 since 2011. The Campbell Hall nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of 15 inspections by state surveyors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse or neglect. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensure nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property, and exploitation.” A March 2021 citation found that Campbell Hall Rehabilitation Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that it failed to prevent neglect in an instance where a resident’s “bilateral heel wound dressings were not changed in the time frame specified in the Medical Doctor’s (MD’s) orders.” The citation goes on to describe documentation that the resident “required extensive two-person assistance with bed mobility and transfer” and “extensive one-person assistance with dressing and toilet use.” The resident’s physician’s orders required that bilateral heel booties be “applied at all times” and that the resident’s wound dressings be changed in a certain manner. According to the citation, it was not changed between 7am and 3pm on a certain day, with a Licensed Practical Nurse stating in an interview that she had failed to change the resident’s wound dressing during the specified time frame. That LPN later refused to change the resident’s dressing when directed by a superior, according to the citation, and her termination at the facility was subsequently terminated.

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A nursing home in Delhi, New York has received 35 citations in the last four years.

Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center has received 35 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on May 12, 2021. The facility additionally received a $2,000 in 2020. The Delhi nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately prevent medication errors. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to keep residents “free of any significant medication errors.” A September 2019 citation found that Delhi Rehabilitation and Nursing Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that staff did not ensure a resident “received significant medications in a timely manner upon admission.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing said she “was not aware” that the resident did not receive medications when they were admitted, and that at the time it “was not uncommon for newly admitted residents to not have their medications on the evening of admission,” because the facility had no backup pharmacy, meaning that if medications weren’t delivered day-of then staff “had to wait till the next day delivery.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of licensed nursing staff.

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