Articles Posted in Nursing Home Violations

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A nursing home in Cohoes, New York has received 22 health and safety code citations since 2017.

Eddy Village Green received 22 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 15, 2021. The facility has also received four fines totaling $22,000 since 2016. The Cohoes nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide residents with environments free of accident hazards and with adequate supervision and assistive devices to prevent avoidable accidents. A 2018 citation found a pattern of failures to prevent such by Eddy Village Green. The citation specifically describes one resident for whom adequate precautions were not taken to prevent elopement; a second resident who was not provided with “identification of the correct diet order to prevent the resident from choking“; and a third resident for whom the facility failed to “ensure the head of his bed was maintained at 45 degrees” in accordance with his physician’s orders. A plan of correction included the application of a wander tag to the first resident and the re-education of relevant staff.

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A nursing home in Albany, New York has received 27 health and safety code citations since 2017.

Daughters of Sarah Nursing Center received 27 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 16, 2021. The facility has also received three fines totaling $22,000 since 2014. The Albany nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of six inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse. Under Section 483.12 of the Federal Code, nursing home residents have “the right to be free from abuse.” An August 2020 citation found that Daughters of Sarah Nursing Center failed to ensure such for one resident. The citation specifically describes a resident with severe cognitive impairment who was abused by a resident with mildly impaired cognition. According to the citation the abuse in question involved “non-consensual sexual intrusion, touching intimate body parts or the clothing covering intimate body parts.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the movement of the victim to a new unit and the placement of the other resident on one-to-one observation and his movement to a different area to avoid contact with the victim.

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A nursing home in Norwich, New York has received numerous health code citations.

Valley View Manor Nursing Home received 17 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 9, 2021. The Norwich nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate accident-prevention measures. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure resident environments remain as free as possible of accident hazards. A September 2019 citation found that Valley View Manor Nursing Home failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that when a resident was suspected of smoking in the nursing home, “there was no investigation completed to assess safety and address interventions to prevent reoccurrence.” The citation goes on to state that the resident’s “history of smoking was not care planned timely to ensure the safety of herself and other residents.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of staff on the facility’s smoking and accident policies.

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The New York nursing home has received numerous health code citations.

Chasehealth Rehab and Residential Care received 27 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 9, 2021. The New Berlin nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent accidents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure residents receive adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents. A May 2021 citation found that Chasehealth Rehab and Residential Care failed to ensure such. The citation specifically describes an employee who “did not receive training and education on the use of assistive devices,” and who provided a walker to resident but did not assist that resident during ambulation in accordance with the resident’s care plan. The resident consequently fell and sustained “a laceration and skin tear.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of the employee in question.

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Staff at New York State Veterans Nursing Home in St. Albans, Queens are reportedly concerned about thousands of boxes of PPE left outside the facility.

New York State Veterans Home in St. Albans, Queens has reportedly left “1,000 boxes of PPE outside under a blue tarp for months,” leaving the supplies vulnerable to the elements, according to a recent report by THE CITY. The personal protective equipment includes medical gowns and other supplies, much of which has reportedly “been rendered unusable from rot and mildew.” Facility staff told the publication that there are “hundreds more boxes of PPE… stacked floor to ceiling” inside the facility, even though those rooms, including a library and a physical therapy unit, are “intended for resident use.”

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The Queens nursing home has received 15 citations since 2017, including one for abuse and one for failing to provide a clean enough environment.

Midway Nursing Home received 15 citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on July 2, 2021. The Maspeth nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state surveyors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse. Under Section 483.12 of the Federal Code guarantees nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A May 2021 citation found that Midway Nursing Home failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the facility did not ensure a resident was kept free from verbal abuse, nor that verbal abuse was immediately reported. The citation goes on to describe an incident in which “a nurse verbally and mentally abused” a resident. According to the citation, staff who witnessed the incident “did not immediately report the incident to the Director of Nursing or Nursing Supervisor,” and the resident later reported experiencing “heightened anger and stress” following the incident of verbal abuse. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the separation of the resident and the nurse, who was later terminated following an investigation. The staffer who witnessed the incident was provided a disciplinary action and re-education.

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Records show that the nursing home in Malone, New York has received 40 health and safety code citations in recent years.

Alice Hyde Medical Center has received 40 citations for violations of public health code between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on June 25, 2021. The facility has also received $26,000 in fines, according to those records. The Malone nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four inspections by state authorities. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents receive adequate supervision to prevent them from sustaining accidents. A January 2020 citation found that Alice Hyde Medical Center failed to ensure such. The citation states specifically that the facility did not ensure a resident who was a known wandering risk “did not elope from the building undetected until she was seen outside at the employee entrance door asking to come back into the facility because she was cold.” According to the citation, the resident’s wander guard alert “was not sounding on the computer” when the resident was outside. In an interview, the nursing home’s facility director aid that the resident was able to enter a stairwell “because there was an issue with the door,” which was attributed to an issue with the door’s magnetic strip. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the education of all staff on the facility’s unsafe wandering policy.

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A new law in New York will create staffing standards for nursing homes.

Legislation signed this month by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo will establish new staffing mandates for nursing homes and hospitals in the state. Under the new law, which will take effect in January 2022, nursing homes will be required to “meet a minimum daily average of 3 1/2 hours of nursing care per resident,” according to a report by Healthcare Dive. Continue reading

The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center at Kingsbridge has received eight citations for violations of public health laws between 2017 and 2021, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on June 18, 2021. Those citations include a finding of systemic accident hazards in the facility, which also received a $10,000 fine in 2016. The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five inspections by state authorities. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent accidents such as elopement. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must keep their facilities “as free of accident hazards as is possible” and provide residents with adequate supervision to prevent accidents. A February 2021 citation found that The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center failed to ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that after new windows were installed in the resident’s rom, the nursing home “failed to ensure the window’s safety latch was in place to prevent the window from tilting into the room and fully opening.” The resident had been identified as at risk for elopement, and had been observed exhibiting increased “exit-seeking behaviors” that were not reported to the physician. At a redacted date, surveillance video showed, the resident opened the window in their room, “threw tied sheets out, and climbed out the window.” They then fell to the ground and were found by staff several hours later, after which they were “transferred to the hospital and expired.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of two Certified Nursing Assistants and a Licensed Practical Nurse.

2. The nursing home did not take adequate steps to prevent physical abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A January 2021 citation found that The Citadel Rehab and Nursing Center failed to ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that during an incident in which a resident slapped a Certified Nursing Assistant, the Certified Nursing Assistant “retaliated and slapped” the resident’s left cheek, causing the resident’s eyeglasses to fall to the floor. The citation states that the incident was witnessed by a housekeeper and another Certified Nursing Assistant. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the suspension and then the termination of the Certified Nursing Assistant.

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A new report argues that a Cuomo administration order in March 2020 caused Covid-19 deaths in nursing homes.

A recent report by the New York State Bar Association’s Long-Term Care Task Force found that a 2020 health order by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo caused deaths in the state’s nursing homes from Covid-19. According to the Times-Union, the new report pushes back on earlier findings by the Department of Health, which concluded that the order did not cause Covid-19 deaths, attributing them to “the unwitting infection of asymptomatic nursing staff members.”

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