Articles Posted in Physical Abuse

Sunharbor Manor received 32 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 16, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2010 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care. The Roslyn Heights nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents the right to freedom from abuse. A July 2019 citation found that Sunharbor Manor did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation states specifically that when a Licensed Practical Nurse approached the resident “from behind and injected him with a syringe through his long-sleeved shirt,” the resident responded with agitation and “tried to hit the nurse,” resulting in the nurse pushing the resident “to the floor causing him to fall sideways in his wheelchair and then to the floor.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing stated that an investigation she conducted ended in the conclusion that “there was possible abuse.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the nurse.

2. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from the administering of unnecessary drugs. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home residents’ drug regimens “must be free from unnecessary drugs.” A February 2017 citation found that Sunharbor Manor did not ensure one resident’s drug regimen “had adequate indications for its use.” The citation states specifically that the resident, who “had no mood or behavior problems” but did have short- and long-term memory problems, received an antipsychotic and antidepressant medication, although the facility’s Psychiatrist stated that “age related cognitive decline was not the appropriate indication” for one of the medications. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the review and revision if necessary of its policy and procedure on antipsychotic medication.

Workmen’s Circle Multicare Center suffered 16 fatalities from Covid-19 as of July 12, 2020, state records report. The nursing home also received 15 citations over violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to health records accessed on July 13, 2020. The Bronx nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately prevent abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure each resident’s right to freedom “from abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property, and exploitation.” A September 2019 citation found that Workmen’s Circle Multicare Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that a Certified Nursing Assistant “acknowledged hitting” a resident “in her eye after the resident became combative during care.” The resident, according to the citation, was later “observed with her hands covered her face and crying.” In an interview, the CNA stated that the resident had become combative and was “hitting her constantly,” and that when the resident hit the CNA in the stomach, CNA “accidentally” hit the resident in the face. “It happened so fast and my hand hit her face,” the CNA stated. The citation goes on to state that the CNA said she declined to notify a nurse that she hit the resident, and a statement she gave the facility noted that she observed the resident’s “eye swollen while she was providing care.” The CNA was later arrested by the police and prosecuted by local authorities, according to the citation.

2. The nursing home did not ensure resident dignity. Section 483.10 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home residents have “a right to be treated with respect and dignity,” which includes a right to the use of personal possessions. A June 2018 citation found that Workmen’s Circle Multicare Center did not ensure this right for two residents. The citation specifically describes an instance in which the facility’s Administrator and Assistant Administrator went into the residents’ room and “without any explanation… opened and searched the residents’ bedside drawers” and threw out one of the resident’s unopened food items “without his permission.” In an interview, the resident’s Assistant Administrator stated that they did not throw out the resident’s food, and that they asked permission before opening the drawers.

The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset received 37 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 19, 2020. The Nesconset nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to “Prohibit and prevent abuse, neglect, and exploitation of residents and misappropriation of resident property.” A September 2018 citation found that The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident in question “reported allegations of sexual and verbal abuse to facility staff,” and these allegations were not “promptly reported” to administrative authorities and investigated until the following day. in an interview, the facility’s social worker said that although she usually interviews residents making such allegations as soon as possible, “she was not made aware of any of the resident’s allegations of abuse” on the day they were made, instead learning of them at a staff meeting the following morning. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of relevant staff.

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Woodhaven Nursing Home received 46 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 24, 2020. The facility has also received two fines: one 2017 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings in an inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding unnecessary; and one 2016 fine of $12,000 in connection to findings in a 2013 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding accidents and administration. The Port Jefferson Station nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not prevent abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code states that nursing home residents have the right to be free from abuse. A November 2019 citation found that Woodhaven Nursing Home did not ensure that right for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident was repeatedly hit by another resident “with a wheelchair with the leg rest in place,” suffering a “laceration with severe bleeding to the right leg” and requiring transfer to the hospital. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the transfer of the resident to a “safe location” and the transfer of the aggressive resident to a hospital for psychiatric evaluation.

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St. Johnland Nursing Center received 37 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 11, 2020. The facility has also received a 2019 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings in a 2019 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions. The Kings Park nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code gives nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” A January 2019 citation found that St. Johnland Nursing Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that one resident demonstrated a “history” of chasing after another, female resident “with a show in his hand.” The citation describes an incident in which the male resident “aggressively grabbed” the female resident’s wheelchair, “causing her to fall to the floor” in an “altercation” which lasted for more than 13 minutes and which staff did not witness, according to the citation. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the counseling of staff responsible for monitoring the aggressor resident, who was “placed on 1:1 supervision” for a period of two weeks.

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Carillon Nursing and Rehabilitation Center received 21 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 28, 2020. The Huntington nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did implement adequate measures to prevent abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code ensures nursing home residents “the right to be free from abuse.” An August 2019 citation found that Carillon Nursing and Rehabilitation Center did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation states specifically that a Certified Nursing Aide pushed a resident “in her bed using his hand over her head/face three times when the resident was trying to get out of bed.” The citation states that according to the patient, the CNA in question “was verbally abusive,” put his hand over her face, and pushed her head into her pillow “three times asking her to shut up.” The resident stated further that the CNA’s aggression and demeanor “shocked” her. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the CNA in question.

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The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Great Neck received 45 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 20, 2020. The Great Neck nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure residents were free from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure residents’ right to freedom from abuse. A July 2018 citation found that The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Great Neck did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that a Certified Nursing Aide “spit on a severely cognitively impaired resident… when the resident was exhibiting verbal and physically abusive behavior.” In an interview, the CNA in question said her action was a “reflex action to spit back when the resident had spit had her.” In another interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing said that “the resident’s dignity was violated and the CNA’s behavior was unacceptable.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included disciplinary action for several CNAs.

2. The nursing home did not provide adequate treatment and care for pressure ulcers. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents receive necessary treatment and services to promote the healing of existing pressure ulcers. A June 2018 citation found that The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Great Neck did not provide such for one resident.

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Acadia Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation received 16 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 21, 2020. The facility also received a 2015 fine of $4,000 in connection to findings in a 2013 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding resident medication errors. The Riverhead, NY nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure residents were protected from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home residents have “the right to be free from abuse.” An October 2019 citation found that Acadia Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation did not ensure one resident was free from abuse. The citation states specifically that a Certified Nursing Assistant witnessed a Licensed Practical Nurse “using foul language and hitting a legally blind resident with cognitive impairment twice on his forehead.” The citation states further that video surveillance documented this incident, and that the LPN was “immediately removed from her assignment.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the LPN. Continue reading

Apex Rehabilitation & Care Center received 29 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 21, 2020. The Huntington Station nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure residents’ right to freedom from abuse. A December 2019 citation found that Apex Rehabilitation & Care Center did not ensure such for two residents. The citation states specifically that two Certified Nursing Assistants “placed the back of [a resident’s] bra strap over the wheelchair handle when the resident was exhibiting behavioral symptoms and constantly trying to stand up from the wheelchair.” The citation states further that one of those CNAs was captured on the facility’s video surveillance pushing a resident “to sit back in his wheelchair.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the interview, suspension, investigation, and termination of both CNAs.

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Grandell Rehabilitation and Nursing Center received 22 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 5, 2020. The facility has also been the subject of a 2018 fine of $12,000 in connection to findings during a 2018 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2016 fine of $16,000 in connection to findings during a 2013 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care, administration, and quality assessment and assurance; a 2011 fine of $34,000 in connection to findings that it violated health code provisions regarding medically related social services, accident hazards, resident well-being, administration, and hydration; and a 2010 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings that it violated health code provisions regarding quality of care and nutrition. The Long Beach nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure residents were protected from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure residents’ right “to be free from abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property, and exploitation.” A May 2018 citation found that Grandell Rehabilitation and Nursing Center did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation states specifically that one of the facility’s Recreation Aides “intentionally threw water” at a resident with a redacted diagnosis. The citation states that the RA admitted to throwing water at the resident. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the termination of the staff member in question.

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