Central Island Healthcare Cited for Abuse, Pressure Ulcers

Central Island Healthcare received 36 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 27, 2020. The Plainview nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not ensure residents were free from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code specifies that nursing home residents are entitled “to be free from abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property, and exploitation.” An April 2018 citation found that Central Island Healthcare did not ensure this right for one resident. The citation found specifically that a Certified Nursing Assistant at the facility “forcibly placed” the resident in their bed “and changed the resident’s clothes against the wishes repeatedly expressed by the resident to remain dressed and out of bed.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the suspension, investigation, and termination of the CNA in question.

2. The nursing home did not maintain sufficiently low medication error rates. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must keep medication error rates below five percent. A February 2018 citation found that Central Island Healthcare did not keep one resident free from low enough error rates. The citation states specifically that the resident was twice administered an injection of a certain medication “without a physician’s orders.” In an interview, the facility’s Assistant Director of Nursing attributed the error to the medication’s end date not being entered in the computer. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the discontinuation of the medication.

3. The nursing home did not ensure necessary treatment and care for pressure ulcers and bedsores. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must ensure that “a resident having pressure sores receives necessary treatment and services to promote healing” and to prevent the development of new sores. A November 2016 citation found that Central Island Healthcare did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the facility provided “no documented evidence that weekly body checks were being conducted” for the resident, who was identified as having two unstageable pressure ulcers, only one of which was present on admission. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the updating of the resident’s care plan to reflect the current status of their wounds

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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