Central Park Rehabilitation And Nursing Center: Coronavirus Deaths, Infection Citations

Central Park Rehabilitation And Nursing Center suffered eight coronavirus deaths as of May 17, 2020, according to state records and local news reports. The nursing home received 15 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on May 18, 2020. The facility has also received three enforcement actions: a 2018 fine of $4,000 in connection to findings in a 2015 inspection that it violated unspecified health code provisions; a 2016 fine of $12,000 in connection to findings in a 2015 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding pressure ulcers and quality of care; and a 2010 fine of $2,000 in connection to findings in a 2009 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding infection control. The Syracuse nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not adequately maintain its infection control program. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must “establish and maintain an infection prevention and control program” to prevent the development and transmission of disease and infection. A January 2020 citation found that Central Park Rehabilitation And Nursing Center did not ensure such a program was properly maintained. The citation states specifically that one of the facility’s Licensed Practical Nurses failed to conduct proper hand hygiene before administering medication to a resident. In an interview, the nurse stated that she knew she did not perform proper hand hygiene, and that hand hygiene should have been performed before she administered the resident’s medication, so as to prevent the spread of infection and flu. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

2. An April 2017 citation also found that Central Park Rehabilitation And Nursing Center failed to adequately maintain its infection prevention and control program. In this instance, an inspector observed a Certified Nursing Assistant wearing her influenza mask “incorrectly in resident areas and when in direct contact with residents.” The CNA in question had “refused to receive the flu vaccine,” according to facility records, and facility policy required that she accordingly wear a flu mask. However, the citation states, the CNA was observed in a resident unit’s dining room “with her mask under her chin and not covering her nose while talking directly to 2 residents.” She was also observed passing drinks to residents in a dining room, occasionally pulling her mask below her mouth to talk to residents, and was later observed talking to a resident “with her mask around her chin area and her nose and mouth uncovered.” In an interview, the CNA said that “she was sick, and the mask was bothering her.”

3. The nursing home did not prevent residents from receiving unnecessary drugs. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code stipulates that “each resident’s drug regimen must be free from unnecessary drugs.” An April 2017 citation found that Central Park Rehabilitation And Nursing Center did not ensure one resident was kept free from such. The citation states specifically that the resident in question was “administered an antipsychotic medication without an adequate indication for use.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a review of the resident’s medication by the facility’s medical and pharmacy consultant, and the medication’s discontinuation.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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