Glen Arden Nursing Home Cited for Elopement

Glen Arden received 15 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 20, 2020. The Goshen nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not employ adequate measures to prevent elopement. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide residents with “adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.” An October 2018 citation found that Glen Arden did not adequately supervise one resident “with cognitive impairment” to prevent elopement. The citation states specifically that the nursing home “did not ensure that electronic devices functioned effectively to alert the staff, prevent unsafe wandering and elopement.” As a result, according to the citation, the resident managed to “bypass an alarm device” and exit the premises unbeknownst to staff. The citation states additionally that the facility was not “free from accident hazards,” noting that “multiple areas in both resident units… had poorly maintained flooring.” The citation states that these deficiencies had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

2. The nursing home did not meet food safety standards. Section 483.60 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure that they “Store, prepare, distribute and serve food in accordance with professional standards for food service safety.” An October 2018 citation found that Glen Arden did not ensure the storage of food in such a manner that food-borne illness was prevented. The citation states specifically that the nursing home did not prevent the storage of uncooked ground beef in a refrigerator beyond its shelf life; the storage of food on the floor of a walk-in refrigerator; and the maintenance of a walk-in freezer’s floor in a clean condition. The citation states that these deficiencies had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

3. The nursing home did not ensure residents were provided an adequately high quality of care. Under Section 483.24 of the Federal Code, nursing homes are required to provide residents “the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, consistent with the resident’s comprehensive assessment and plan of care.” An April 2017 citation found that Glen Arden did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the nursing home did not address recommendations “reflected in a swallowing evaluation… to prevent complications related to dysphagia.” Among other things, according to the citation, the resident was observed eating for ten minutes without supervision during a mealtime, without any facility staff prompting the resident to implement recommendations including small sips through a straw and the alternation of liquids and solids. When a staff member “eventually sat at the table to feed another resident,” according to the citation, this staffer did not prompt the resident. In an interview, the facility’s Registered Nurse unit manager stated that “she had reviewed the evaluation but overlooked instructing the nursing staff on the supervision of the resident.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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