Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center Cited for Pressure Ulcers

Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center received 21 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on March 28, 2020. The Sayville nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer (bedsore) care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure that a resident with pressure ulcers receives “necessary treatment and services, consistent with professional standards of practice, to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.” A March 2018 citation found that Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specificaly that the resident developed a deep tissue injury on their right heel while in the facility, but that “multiple observations were made of the heel not being offloaded (to prevent contact with any surface) per physician’s orders.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing Services stated that the facility should have provided the resident with “better coordinated” care and that the resident’s “care plan should have been updated” with more specific interventions.

2. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to keep resident drug regimens free of unnecessary drugs. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home resident drug regimens “must be free from unnecessary drugs.” A December 2016 citation found that Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident was administered an anti-hypertensive medication after a medical episode “without adequate monitoring to ensure adequate indications.” The citation states further that the resident was administered the medication without monitoring of their blood pressure and pulse. In an interview, the facility’s Registered Nurse Manager stated that “there was nothing that indicated to re-take the resident’s blood pressure/pulse” and that the physician should have been made aware of the resident’s low blood pressure on a certain date. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a review of the resident’s medication administration records.

3. The nursing home did not ensure the competency of nursing staff. Section 483.35 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to “have sufficient nursing staff with the appropriate competencies and skills sets to provide nursing and related services.” A March 2018 citation found that Good Samaritan Nursing and Rehabilitation Care did not ensure its nurse aids “were able to demonstrate competency in skills and techniques necessary to care for residents’ needs.” The citation states specifically that a resident was observed in several instances with blood on his pillow from his left ear. According to the citation, the facility’s Certified Nursing Assistants “were aware of this change in condition but did not report the blood” to nurses. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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