Hollis Park Manor Nursing Home Cited for Pressure Ulcer Care

Hollis Park Manor Nursing Home received 39 citations for violations of public health laws between 2015 and 2019, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on January 10, 2020. The Hollis nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement adequate (bedsore) pressure ulcer care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to provide residents with a level of treatment and services that prevents the infection of pressure ulcers. An August 2018 citation found that a resident did not receive the necessary care and treatment to prevent the infection of a sacral pressure ulcer. An inspector specifically observed that “there was no dressing observed to the sacral area” on the resident’s ulcer” during care. In an interview, a Certified Nursing Assistant stated that he had removed the dressing while changing the resident; in another interview, a Licensed Practical Nurse stated that CNAs “are not to remove any dressings,” and to inform nurses if dressings become soiled or fall off the wound.

2. The nursing home did not follow food sanitation practices. Section 483.60 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to store food in accordance with professional safety standards. A May 2017 citation found Hollis Park Manor Nursing Home did not properly store food so as to prevent food-borne illness. An inspector specifically observed that “milk for the lunch service was not maintained at the proper temperature,” noting that regular milk was stored at 51.9 degrees Fahrenheit while fat free milk was stored at 56 degrees Fahrenheit. In interviews, the facility’s Assistant Food Service Director said the correct temperature for milk was 48 degrees, while a Dietary Aide said the correct temperature was below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, which the Assistant FSD then “agreed with.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the disposal of the food in question.

3. The nursing home did not properly follow its infection control practices. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to establish an infection prevention and control program to provide a safe environment for residents. A May 2017 citation found that Hollis Park Manor Nursing Home did not ensure proper practices on two instances. In one, an inspector observed two of the facility’s nurses conduct finger stick glucose tests “without cleaning after use.” In another, an inspector observed a nurse “preparing intravenous medication (IV) in an unsanitary environment,” without preparing a clean field in which to prepare the medications. The citation states that these deficiencies had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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