Huntington Living Center: Accident, Infection Citations

Huntington Living Center has received 38 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on August 28, 2020. The Waterloo nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of seven surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to prevent accidents. Under Section 483.25 of the Federal Code, nursing homes must create a resident environment as free as possible from accident hazards, and with adequate supervision to prevent accidents. A February 2020 citation found that Huntington Living Center did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that a resident smoked in an area that was not designated for smoking, and the resident was further storing their own lighter. The citation goes on to state that the resident’s smoking supplies were supposed to be stored in the nurse’s unit, and that the resident was supposed to smoke off-property at the far side of a parking lot. In an interview, the resident stated that “they were supposed to smoke over on the next street by the church, but it was further away,” and that “they try to remember to lock the lighters up but they do not always remember to do that.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a review of the facility’s smoking policies and protocols.

2. The nursing home did not adequately prevent infection. Under Section 483.80 of the Federal Code, nursing home facilities are supposed to endeavor to prevent and control infections via an infection control program. A February 2020 citation found that Huntington Living Center did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that the nursing home’s employees “did not follow appropriate infection control techniques or hand hygiene” for three residents reviewed for blood glucose testing and wound infections. It goes on to state that a blood sugar monitoring device was not properly cleaned after three resident uses, and that appropriate hand hygiene was not followed for another resident. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of relevant staff.

3. The nursing home did not take adequate measures to protect residents from unnecessary drugs. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code requires that each nursing home resident’s drug regimen “be free from unnecessary drugs.” An April 2017 citation found that Huntington Living Center did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that there was a lack of monitoring for a resident’s stool-softener medication during a period in which the resident had loose stools. According to the citation, nursing assistants did not report the resident’s diarrhea before the resident was taken to the hospital for treatment. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the review and discontinuation of the resident’s medication.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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