Northern Metropolitan Residential Health Care Facility Cited for Pressure Sores

Northern Metropolitan Residential Health Care Facility received 17 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on February 13, 2020. The Monsey nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of two surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not implement proper steps to care for pressure ulcers and bedsores. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates, among other things, that nursing home facilities must provide residents with the necessary treatment and care to promote the healing of pressure sores. A March 2017 citation found that Northern Metropolitan Residential Health Care Facility did not ensure the provision of necessary care and treatment to a resident with a sacral pressure ulcer. The citation states specifically that the nursing home “did not ensure that a protein supplement was administered to the resident as ordered by a Nurse Practitioner to promote wound healing.” In an interview, one of the facility’s Registered Nurses stated that the supplement “was not correctly picked up” and as such was not given to the resident. The citation describes this deficiency as having the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

2. The nursing home did not ensure compliance with food safety standards. Section 483.60 of the Federal Code states that nursing home facilities must store food in accordance with “professional standards for food service safety.” A March 2017 citation found that Northern Metropolitan Residential Health Care Facility did not ensure such. An inspector found specifically that pot-holding gloves and a plastic soup spoon “were coated with what appeared to be dried tomato sauce”; that “dried food” was present on the interior and exterior of a hot box; that “loose food debris, black spots, and food spills were found on multiple plastic shelves”; that debris including sugar packets and food were present on the floor; that several shelves “had dried food spills and food debris”; and that a fan had “heavy dust” accumulated on it. The citation states that these deficiencies had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

3. The nursing home did not ensure residents were provided with adequately intact linens. Section 483.10 of the Federal Code states that nursing home facilities must provide residents with “Clean bed and bath linens that are in good condition.” A March 2017 citation found that Northern Metropolitan Residential Health Care Facility did not ensure the good condition of resident linens. The citation states specifically that an inspector observed “linens used as blankets by residents [were] thin, threadbare and had holes.” The citation states that such linens were observed in five resident rooms, and that a resident stated in an interview that “he was cold at night because the blankest [sic] was too thin to use and did not provide any warmth.” In an interview, the facility’s administrator said “he was not aware of the current situation with the linens and that he would look into having the blankets upgraded.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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