Queens Boulevard Extended Care Cited over Pressure Ulcers

Queens Boulevard Extended Care received 16 citations for violations of public health laws between 2015 and 2019, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on December 19, 2019. The Woodside nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of three inspections by state authorities. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate treatment and services to promote the prevention and healing of pressure ulcers and bedsores. Section 483.25(c) of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home facilities must provide treatment and services to promote the healing of pressure injuries / ulcers, and to ensure that residents admitted without pressure ulcers do not develop them unless medically unavoidable. An August 2019 citation found that Queens Boulevard Extended Care did not provide a resident with a level of treatment and services consistent with professional standards to promote the healing of their ulcers. An inspector specifically found that the facility did not implement the use of pressure relieving devices for a resident who had bilateral heel wounds. The inspector observed a Registered Nurse performing wound care treatment to both of the resident’s feet, but without putting pressure relieving devices in place after completing the wound care. A review of care records did not find any “documented evidence for the application of the use of heel protectors while in bed,” although facility policy provided for the use of pressure relief assistive devices in instances when pressure relief was warranted.

2. The nursing home did not uphold proper food safety standards. Section 483.60 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure the storage of food in a manner consistent professional standards, and to serve food under sanitary conditions. An October 2017 citation found that Queens Boulevard Extended Care did not ensure the storage, preparation, and service of food “under sanitary conditions to prevent food-borne illness.” The citation specifically states that the facility stored prepared tuna fish without a label or date; left raw Italian sausage “uncovered on a tray in a rack stored inside the refrigerator”; and stored a tuna fish sandwich, applesauce, and raw ground turkey without maintaining temperatures of “41 degrees Fahrenheit and below.” The citation states that this deficiency was “widespread” and had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

3. The nursing home did not ensure residents were provided an environment free of accident hazards. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must provide an environment as free as possible from accident hazards, as well as adequate staff supervision and assistive devices to prevent residents from experiencing accidents. A July 2016 citation found that Queens Boulevard Extended Care Facility did not maintain an environment free of accident hazards. An inspector specifically found that “plastic bags were used to extend a cognitively impaired resident’s light switch,” which created a hazard for that resident. In an interview, the facility’s Charge Nurse told an inspector that “she was aware the plastic bag was a safety risk, but she did not think the resident would choke or suffocate herself.” The facility’s Administrator later stated that the plastic bag should not be used as such, and that the facility would address the problem “immediately.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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