Rome Memorial Hospital: 2 Infection Citations, 14 Covid-19 Deaths

Rome Memorial Hospital suffered 14 fatalities from Covid-19 as of July 12, 2020, per state records. The nursing home also received six citations finding it violated public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to health records accessed on July 13, 2020, including two concerning its infection prevention procedures. The Rome nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of two surveys by state inspectors. The violations they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not take adequate infection control measures. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must create and maintain infection prevention and control programs that ensure residents a safe and sanitary environment. A September 2017 citation found that Rome Memorial Hospital did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that a nurse at the facility “did not disinfect a shared glucometer… with an approved disinfectant before, between, or after testing blood sugars” for two residents. In an interview, the LPN said that policy required that she wipe down the thermometer with a germicidal wipe or alcohol pad between resident uses, and that she usually used alcohol wipes, but that she did not in this instance because “she was nervous.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the re-education of Registered Nurses and LPNs.

2. A January 2019 citation also found that Rome Memorial Hospital fell short in its infection control practices. According to this citation, a resident “was observed with his catheter tubing and collection bag uncovered and directly on the floor.” In an interview, a CNA stated that when the resident was in bed, the CNAs “hung his catheter on the side of the bed” and that it should not be touching the floor, as this posed an infection risk. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of staff on infection control practices related to drainage bags.

3. The nursing home did not provide an adequate quality of care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents receive a quality of treatment and care that allows them to attain their highest potential well-being. A September 2017 citation found that Rome Memorial Hospital did not ensure such. The citation specifically describes a resident who “was ordered to have an abductor pillow… in place at all times” and who was observed without the pillow in place. In an interview, one of the resident’s family members stated that “she visited often and had never seen the abductor cushion used in bed or in the wheelchair.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of staff on following physician’s orders.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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