Ross Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation Cited for Pressure Ulcer Care

Ross Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation received 31 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 9, 2020. The facility has also received a 2011 fine of $10,000 in connection to findings in a 2010 inspection that it violated health code provisions regarding accidents and supervision. The Brentwood nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of five surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not provide adequate bedsore / pressure ulcer treatment and care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to ensure that residents with pressure ulcers are provided with treatment and services necessary “to promote healing, prevent infection and prevent new ulcers from developing.” A July 2017 citation found that Ross Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the nursing home “did not effectively evaluate factors that could be removed or modified to stabilize, reduce, or remove risk factors which contributed to the development and deterioration” of the resident’s pressure ulcer. According to the citation, the resident was given a concave mattress placed atop a pressure relieving mattress. In interviews, facility staff suggested that the concave mattress “impeded staff from properly turning and positioning” the resident, and further that the mattress “did not provide optimum level of pressure reduction for wound healing.” As such, according to the citation, the resident “developed a stage 2 pressure ulcer which then deteriorated to a stage 3.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the educational counseling of its Unit Manager.

2. The nursing home did not protect residents from the use of unnecessary medications. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code states that nursing home residents’ drug regimens “must be free from unnecessary drugs.” A January 2017 citation found that “Ross Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation” did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident’s medication was increased from 12.5 milligrams thrice daily to 25 milligrams thrice daily, but that there was no “adequate medical justification” for this increase or any “documented evidence that non-pharmacological interventions were attempted” first. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the review and revision of the resident’s medical records.

3. The nursing home did not employ adequate accident prevention measures. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code states that nursing homes must ensure resident environments are “as free of accident hazards as is possible.” A September 2019 citation found that Ross Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that an inspector observed an unlocked biohazard room in the facility. It goes on to state that “Hazardous chemicals and dirty linens were found stored inside the biohazard room,” and that residents who were both “ambulatory and confused” resided in rooms close to the biohazard room. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included a review of the room’s lock, which found it to be defective, and the ordering of a new lock.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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