Teresian House Nursing Home Cited for Infection; 17 COVID Deaths

1. The nursing home did not maintain adequate infection control practices. Section 483.80 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure the implementation of an infection prevention and control program that creates a safe and sanitary environment for residents. An April 2018 citation found that Teresian House Nursing Home did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that staff in one of the facility’s service kitchens did not wash hands or change gloves while touching food during the process of making a sandwich, and that “food was not covered as it was being transported across the hall to resident lounge area.” The citation goes on to state additionally that a resident was not given a Mantoux test when they were admitted. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of relevant staff.

2. The nursing home did not employ adequate measures to prevent accidents. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must provide residents with “adequate supervision and assistance devices to prevent accidents.” The citation states specifically that a resident who had a “roam alert” was not adequately supervised after they were escorted to the facility’s chapel by a staffer. The citation goes on to state that the facility’s front door did not alarm when the resident exited the building and returned a short time later through the same front door.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the testing and replacement of the resident’s roam alert bracelet.

3. The nursing home did not comply with food safety standards. Section 483.60 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to “Store, prepare, distribute and serve food in accordance with professional standards for food service safety.” An October 2019 citation found that Teresian House Nursing Home did not ensure such. The citation states specifically that automatic dish washing machines in the facility’s kitchen “were not rinsing and the specified water pressure, and floors and equipment were not clean.” The citation states further that staffers did not follow safe food handling practices, with an an inspector specifically observing a Certified Nursing Assistant preparing and serving food, without removing her gloves after touching non-food items, nor washing her hands after she removed her gloves. The citation states that this deficiency had the “potential to cause more than minimal harm.”

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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