The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center Cited for Abuse

The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset received 37 citations for violations of public health code between 2016 and 2020, according to New York State Department of Health records accessed on April 19, 2020. The Nesconset nursing home’s citations resulted from a total of four surveys by state inspectors. The deficiencies they describe include the following:

1. The nursing home did not protect residents from abuse. Section 483.12 of the Federal Code requires nursing homes to “Prohibit and prevent abuse, neglect, and exploitation of residents and misappropriation of resident property.” A September 2018 citation found that The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident in question “reported allegations of sexual and verbal abuse to facility staff,” and these allegations were not “promptly reported” to administrative authorities and investigated until the following day. in an interview, the facility’s social worker said that although she usually interviews residents making such allegations as soon as possible, “she was not made aware of any of the resident’s allegations of abuse” on the day they were made, instead learning of them at a staff meeting the following morning. A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the in-servicing of relevant staff.

2. The nursing home did not provide adequate pressure ulcer care. Section 483.25 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing homes must ensure residents receive a high standard of care to prevent the development of bedsores / pressure ulcers. A September 2017 citation found that The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset did not ensure such for one resident. The citation states specifically that the resident’s care plan “was not effective to prevent a Stage 3 pressure ulcer,” and further that a Licensed Practical Nurse did not report a change in the resident’s skin integrity. The citation goes on to state that when a Certified Nursing Assistant observed blood on the resident’s pillow, the RN reported it to the LPN, who observed redness and an excoriation on the resident”s skin but “did not report it to anyone.” In an interview, the facility’s Director of Nursing Services stated that the LPN “should have documented the redness/excoriation and reported it so an interview could have been completed.” A plan of correction undertaken by the facility included the disciplining and education of the LPN.

3. The nursing home did not prevent residents from being administered unnecessary drugs. Section 483.45 of the Federal Code stipulates that nursing home residents’ drug regimens “must be free from unnecessary drugs,” and that residents who use psychotropic drugs must “receive gradual dose reductions, and behavioral interventions, unless clinically contraindicated.” A September 2017 citation found that The Hamlet Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center at Nesconset did not ensure two residents received gradual dose reductions and behavioral interventions to attempt to discontinue the drugs, or that the residents had documented clinical justification for the use of the drugs. The citation states specifically that one resident was administered an antipsychotic medication at bedtime “for 19 months without an attempt of Gradual Dose Reduction (GDR) or a clinical justification” o rational for the use of the drug. The second resident was also administered antipsychotic medications in the absent of documented clinical symptoms or the consideration of a GDR.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Thomas L. Gallivan, PLLC work diligently to protect the rights of nursing home residents.  Please contact us to discuss in the event you have a potential case involving neglect or abuse.

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